Jeremy Gardiner painting plein air Start Point Devon

JEREMY GARDINER

In Gardiner’s paintings we find the same sensation as when walking among mountains – of man’s staggering insignificance, and the consequent sense of liberation at being so small and so transitory an episode in the greater scheme of things.

Andrew Lambirth

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Jeremy Gardiner painting plein air on wooden bench, Ballard Point in the background

I prepare the sheets prior to painting by cutting shapes from my composition and combining them to create a paper relief.

I then paint the surface, using washes as well as areas of thick impasto to further embellish the relief surface.

I also fill and skim the surface with jesmonite. This gives the painting a feeling of recession by the use of hard edge forms and accents against blurred shapes and areas.

I then engrave the surface with my line drawing and use gum arabic to slow the drying time of my watercolour washes.

This also increases the transparency and creates greater luminosity of colour.

My process requires the watercolour to dry at interim stages and I move from one painting to another as the drying takes place.

Jeremy Gardiner painting plein air with brush and watercolours, Ballard Point in the background
Jeremy Gardiner painting plein air with brush and watercolours, Ballard Point in the background

Each layer is allowed to dry before the next one is applied, each colour is transparent and every layer modifies any colour painted over it.

Building up layers of washes enables you to paint forms in pale washes with additional layers, adding richness.

Sometimes the first tentative washes can co-exist alongside final overlays, leaving a record of spontaneity.